"Please tell Ken Palmer we really appreciated him and all that you folks back east did for North Dakota, and that I personally heard many positive comments on his presentation skills and arborist knowledge. Ken is an asset to the arboriculture industry. The sharing of his knowledge with practicing arborists is helping advance the professionalism of this industry in leaps and bounds. I hope he has success and good fortune in all of his future endeavors. Take care."


I know that climbers wear saddles and tie into the tree as a safety precaution from falling. Our tree company works with aerial lifts most of the time. What is the best fall protection system for us?

I know that climbers wear saddles and tie into the tree as a safety precaution from falling. Our tree company works with aerial lifts most of the time. What is the best fall protection system for us?

Aerial lift operators have two options. They can wear a full body harness with a dorsal attachment and a shock absorbing lanyard that is connected to the upper boom and designed to decelerate a falling person and bring a them to a gradual stop should they fall or be launched from the bucket or platform (This is a fall arrest system). Or an operator may wear a body belt and connect to the upper boom with a very short lanyard intended to prevent the operator from being able to fall from the bucket or platform at all (This is a fall restraint system). Each has its advantages and disadvantages. Though the fall restraint system is relatively simple and inexpensive, it restricts body movement when working. However if we were to lengthen the lanyard, it would no longer be able to prevent a fall from occurring. Even with a shock absorbing lanyard, a fall in a body belt could be catastrophic because a body belt is not intended or designed to suspend or catch a person that has fallen. For this reason the fall arrest system may be preferred. Remember to inspect your chosen system every day for signs of wear or stress!


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